A History of Cambodia

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Westview Press, Mar 4, 2009 - History - 304 pages
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In this clear and concise volume, author David Chandler provides a timely overview of Cambodia, a small but increasingly visible Southeast Asian nation. Praised by the "Journal of Asian Studies "as an "original contribution, superior to any other existing work," this acclaimed text has now been completely revised and updated to include material examining the early history of Cambodia, whose famous Angkorean ruins now attract more than one million tourists each year, the death of Pol Pot, and the revolution and final collapse of the Khmer Rouge. The fourth edition reflects recent research by major scholars as well as Chandler's long immersion in the subject and contains an entirely new section on the challenges facing Cambodia today, including an analysis of the current state of politics and sociology and the increasing pressures of globalization. This comprehensive overview of Cambodia will illuminate, for undergraduate students as well as general readers, the history and contemporary politics of a country long misunderstood.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE BEGINNINGS OF CAMBODIAN HISTORY
13
Indianization
15
Funan
18
Government and Society in Early Cambodia
27
KINGSHIP AND SOCIETY AT ANGKOR
35
Sources for Angkorean History
36
Jayavarman II and the Founding of Angkor
39
CAMBODIAS RESPONSE TO FRANCE 191645
187
The Assassination of Resident Bardez
191
The Beginnings of Nationalism
194
The Impact of World War II
201
The Growth of Nationalism and the Return of the French
207
GAINING INDEPENDENCE
211
The Development of Political Parties
212
The Growth of the Left
218

Yasovarman and His Successors
42
Angkorean Kingship
53
Angkor Wat
56
JAYAVARMAN VII AND THE CRISIS OF THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY
65
Jayavarman VII and Buddhist Kingship
66
The Temples of Jayavarman VII
73
Theravada Buddhism and the Crisis of the Thirteenth Century
80
Zhou Daguans Account of Angkor 129697
83
CAMBODIA AFTER ANGKOR
91
The Shift from Angkor to Phnom Penh
92
Cambodia in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries
96
Values in SeventeenthCentury Cambodia
106
Vietnamese and Thai Activities in Cambodia
112
Conclusions
115
STATE SOCIETY AND FOREIGN RELATIONS 17941848
119
Society and Economy
120
Patronage and Government
125
The Okya
130
Cambodias Relations with Vietnam and Siam
136
THE CRISIS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
141
The Imposition of Vietnamese Control
142
The Vietnamization of Cambodia 183540
149
Siam and the Restoration of Cambodian Independence
161
THE EARLY STAGES OF THE FRENCH PROTECTORATE
167
The Establishment of the French Protectorate
171
The Tightening of French Control
174
Sisowaths Early Years
180
Sihanouk and the Achievement of Independence
224
FROM INDEPENDENCE TO CIVIL WAR
233
Sihanouks Policies
238
Opposition to Sihanouk
240
A Balance Sheet
242
Sihanouks Decline
244
The Coup of 1970
249
The Khmer of Republics Slow Collapse
251
REVOLUTION IN CAMBODIA
255
DK Takes Power 197576
258
The FourYear Plan
262
A Crisis in the Party
265
Conflict with Vietname
269
DK Closes Down
272
CAMBODIA SINCE 1979
277
Opposition to the PRK
281
The CGDK
283
The Vietnamese Withdrawal
285
The UNTAC Period and After
286
The End of the Khmer Rouge
289
The Coup de Force of 1997
290
TwentyFirstCentury Cambodia
293
Conclusion
296
Notes
301
Bibliography
339
Index
351
Copyright

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Page 159 - We are happy killing Vietnamese. We no longer fear them; in all our battles we are mindful of the three jewels [of Buddhism]: the Buddha, the law, and the monastic...
Page 175 - enact all the administrative, judicial, financial, and commercial reforms which the French government judges necessary in the interest of the protectorate.
Page 334 - REVISING THE PAST IN DEMOCRATIC KAMPUCHEA: WHEN WAS THE BIRTHDAY OF THE PARTY?
Page 153 - As for language, they should be taught to speak Vietnamese. [Our habits of] dress and table manners must also be followed. If there is any out-dated or barbarous custom that can be simplified, or repressed, then do so.24 The emperor closed by advising Giang to move cautiously in engineering social change.
Page 98 - King, which is why Christians cannot be made without the King's approval. And if some of my readers should say that they could be converted without the King knowing it, to this I answer that the people of the country is of such a nature, that nothing is done that the King knoweth not; and anybody be he never so simple may speak with the King, wherefore everyone seeketh news to carry unto him, to have an occasion for to speak with him; whereby without the King's good will nothing can be done, and...
Page 60 - Brahma along similar lines, beginning with another golden age. The fact that the length of these four eras correlates exactly with particular distances along the east-west axis of Angkor Wat suggests that the code...
Page 150 - Cambodian officials only know how to bribe and be bribed. Offices are sold; nobody carries out orders; everyone works for his own account. When we tried to recruit soldiers, the king was perfectly willing, but the officials concealed great numbers of people.

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About the author (2009)

David Chandler, an emeritus professor of history at Monash University in Australia, is currently an adjunct Professor of Asian Studies at Georgetown University.

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